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Sheepdogs could lose their jobs to robots after scientists learned the secret of their herding ability.

Rounding up sheep successfully is a simple process involving just two basic mathematical rules, a study found.

One causes a sheepdog to close any gaps it sees between dispersing sheep. The other results in sheep being driven forward once the gaps have sufficiently closed.

A computer simulation showed that obeying these two rules alone allowed a single shepherd – or sheepdog – to control a flock of more than 100 animals.

The discovery has implications for human crowd control as well as the development of robots that can gather and herd livestock, the scientists said. […]

To conduct the study, the researchers fitted a flock of sheep and a sheepdog with backpacks containing highly accurate GPS satnavs.

Movement-tracking data from the devices was programmed into computer simulations to develop the mathematical shepherding model.

Writing in the Journal of the Royal Society Interface, the researchers concluded: “Our approach should support efficient designs for herding autonomous, interacting agents in a variety of contexts.

"Obvious cases are robot-assisted herding of livestock, and keeping animals away from sensitive areas, but applications range from control of flocking robots, cleaning up of environments and human crowd control."

Aug 28, 2014 / 80 notes
Aug 14, 2014 / 2 notes
Jan 27, 2014
Jan 13, 2014 / 2 notes

skrekkogle:

A little Mario-ish, somehow

timoarnall:

Messages from machines. 27 March, 20.57 by Timo Arnall.
Dec 13, 2013 / 177,516 notes

timoarnall:

Messages from machines. 27 March, 20.57 by Timo Arnall.

skrekkogle:

“This week at the TED conference in Long Beach, Calif., the company [Autodesk] will take the first public step toward translating its computer design approach, which has since spilled over from Hollywood to the Maker movement, into the emerging nanoscale world of synthetic biology and materials.
For the last two years, a small group of software engineers and molecular biologists have been developing a software system for designing at the molecular level at the company’s research laboratory in downtown San Francisco. At the TED conference, Autodesk will introduce “Project Cyborg,” a Web-based software platform for delivering a range of services like molecular modeling and simulation.”
Bits - NYTimesAutodesk - Project Cyborg(via New Aesthetic)
Oct 24, 2013 / 2 notes

skrekkogle:

This week at the TED conference in Long Beach, Calif., the company [Autodesk] will take the first public step toward translating its computer design approach, which has since spilled over from Hollywood to the Maker movement, into the emerging nanoscale world of synthetic biology and materials.

For the last two years, a small group of software engineers and molecular biologists have been developing a software system for designing at the molecular level at the company’s research laboratory in downtown San Francisco. At the TED conference, Autodesk will introduce “Project Cyborg,” a Web-based software platform for delivering a range of services like molecular modeling and simulation.

Bits - NYTimes
Autodesk - Project Cyborg
(via New Aesthetic)

Oct 24, 2013
Rodney Brooks focuses on an important element missing in most contemporary analyses of cognitive, psychological, and computer systems - the central role of lower-level motor processes. Too often we forget that consciousness, sensing, and learning evolved in the service of guiding movement. Without movement these capacities would never have emerged. Yet how many cognitive and computer scientists ponder the ramifications of this fact? Pure motor systems can be adaptive (imagine an “eating machine” gobbling algae on a pond bottom), yet a cognitive endowment would be useless to a non-moving entity. Of course, the hypothetical eating machine would do even better if it could use sensors to more efficiently encounter algae, or to develop strategies based on past experience to increase further its feeding efficiency.
Sep 28, 2013
Jun 30, 2013
Jun 27, 2013
Jun 21, 2013 / 58 notes

new-aesthetic:

Dr. Easy (by Shynola)

Michael is a broken man with a gun. He is surrounded by armed police. A robot with medical training is dispatched to negotiate – but can it save him?

(‘Dr. Easy’ is the prologue for a planned feature adaptation of Matthew de Abaitua’s novel “The Red Men”, which, first published (with my involvement) in 2007, features robotic policemen, virtual workers, algorithmic creativity, austerity-based techno-rejectionism and much else, and as such prefigures a range of New Aesthetic interests.)

Jan 2, 2013 / 2 notes
new-aesthetic:

“This calendar is based on a set of photo’s released by Darpa that shows the love the makers have for these fauna inspired robots, elevating the robots to pets or companions.”
Darpa_2013 by DNVDK (Calendar) - Lulu
Dec 21, 2012 / 83 notes

new-aesthetic:

“This calendar is based on a set of photo’s released by Darpa that shows the love the makers have for these fauna inspired robots, elevating the robots to pets or companions.”

Darpa_2013 by DNVDK (Calendar) - Lulu

Sep 4, 2012
Mar 23, 2012